What is an encaustic monotype?

This art form blends the ancient art of encaustic painting with the printmaking process.  A unique or one-of-a-kind print - called a monotype - is created by painting encaustic wax medium on a hot surface where it stays liquid until transferred to paper.  Several print passes can be made, building layers, depth and textures.  

How to display an encaustic monotype?

Scratching and chipping may occur, so as with any art, handle with careEncaustic monotypes do not need to be displayed under glass. When shown without a glass covering, additional textures become apparent adding dimensionality to the piece.  Colors appear more vibrant. 

If piece is mounted on cradle board (wooden backing), the piece may be displayed as is. The surface of the monotype may be gently wiped with a clean cotton cloth to remove dust that might accumulate over time.  Do not use any liquids (soaps, solvents, water...) to clean the monotype.  If you wish to frame a piece mounted on cradle board, a 'floater frame' may be a good choice.  A frame shop should be able to assist you.

 

If piece is already framed, using glass on top of the print is recommended solely to keep the mat in good condition.  Framed monotypes are not shipped with glass.  If you wish to display it under glass, please purchase good quality anti-reflective glass from a frame shop.  

 

Monotypes should not be hung in an area of high humidity, direct sunlight or any area where the temperature might exceed 125 degrees.  

Paintings with beeswax and oil paint - what's that all about?

Beeswax is mixed with resins and solvents and then oil paint is added to this medium. Working with beeswax and oil paint allows an artist to add texture and surface complexity to a painting.  This technique is also known as 'cold wax painting,' to differentiate it from encaustic painting using melted wax that is heated and fused to a surface.  Beeswax has been used as an extender of oil paint for centuries.

How to display a painting made with beeswax and oil paint?

Resins and solvents are added to the beeswax. Scratching and chipping may occur even after the painting is fully cured, so as with any art, handle with care.  These paintings do not need to be displayed under glass.  When shown without a glass covering, textures are more apparent adding dimension to the piece. 

If the piece is mounted on cradle board (wooden backing), the piece may be displayed as is. The surface may be gently wiped with a clean cotton cloth to remove dust that might accumulate over time.  Do not use any liquids (soaps, solvents, water...) to clean the painting.  If you wish to frame a piece mounted on cradle board, use a 'floater frame.'  A frame shop should be able to assist you.

 

If piece is framed, using glass on top of the painting is recommended solely to keep the mat in good condition.  Framed paintings are not shipped with glass.  If you wish to display it under glass, please purchase good quality anti-reflective glass from a frame shop.  

Should you have any questions, please email me through the Contact webpage.

© 2020 Jennifer Dreyfus

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